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off vs away | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: 'Off campus' is a standard idiom that signifies the opposite of 'on campus' (in a dorm, a classroom, etc.). For my first two years in college I lived in a dorm. Then I moved off campus. During the strike, I taught my seminar in a coffee shop off campus. To me, 'we live off Main Street' means that to get to our house, one drives down Main St. and turns onto our street at some point. "We live See more ...

off of vs. off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Inner Hebrides - Is a group of islands lying just off of the west coast of Scotland partially between the coast and the Outer Hebrides. The group includes Islay to the south and stretches north to the Isle of Skye [] ==== UK Islands ==== British example using 'off of.' See more ...

Offline vs off-line | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: When two words are first combined, as in "off" and "line" here, they are often written with a hyphen. Over time, the hyphen may be dropped. "Offline" is a recent concept, so the transition is not yet complete. Other examples: what was once "e-mail" is now almost universally "email." What was once a "Web site" is now usually a "website." Other examples, some of them from well before the See more ...

from/off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hello, everybody I am in doubt whether to use "off" or "from" in the following sentencd about "storms sewer/drain" "A storm sewer/drain is a place where urban runoff can flow into off/from the streets in the event of a flood" Could I use from or off? Is that correct? Or does it sound odd See more ...

depend on and depend of | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hi everyone, Depending of the United Kingdom law, we might require additional details about General Partners, such as contact address, scan of the ID or passport and other details required to Know Our Clients. I have been taught that the preposition on or upon is used after "depend" but See more ...

Remove off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: We will remove the test instruments off of Unit # 6. We will remove the test instruments from Unit # 6. what about "take off" ? Can I use it instead of "remove from" Please advise ASAP. Regards, Ali . JamesM Senior Member. Los Angeles, California. English, USA Dec 17, 2010 #2 I would say: We will take the test instruments off of Unit #6. We will remove the test instruments from Unit #6. The See more ...

electricity is off or out | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Our electricity went off at 2am but came back on an hour later - we don't know why. Our electricity cut out at 2am but came back on an hour later - we don't know why (there could be many reasons). Our electricity was cut off at 2am but came back on an hour later - this implies agency, usually it's the supplier, or occasionally an act of God (a storm or some such). In the UK, the grid has See more ...

One-off vs. one-time | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: In the US "one-off" isn't used that much, and when it is used it's generally used as a noun: "this sale is a one-off; it won't be repeated." As an adjective we would generally use "one-time": "it was a one-time event." Maybe heypresto can fill you in on British usage. heypresto Senior Member. South East England . English - England Jan 12, 2017 #6 Personally I would use 'one-off' as an See more ...

dispose of/dispose off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Iam confused whether it is dispose of or dispose off as I see a lot of sentences that use dispose off. But when I searched I could just find that dispose of is the phrasal verb that should be used. Please help. Last edited by a moderator: Sep 9, 2015. cycloneviv Senior Member. Perth, Western Australia. English - Australia Jun 22, 2007 #2 Yes, "dispose of" is the correct way to say it. They See more ...

as a result of / as the result of | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Dear friends!!! The expression "as a result of" is a fixed expression used to mean that something happened after something else and one thing was the reason of the other (or one thing was the consequence of the other - this is the same). But there is also a phrase "as the result of something". My point of view is that there is a fixed expression, as I have said above, "as a result", but we can See more ...

off or from | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: "Off" the xx coast" means "away from the coast" per this WR definition: away from; apart or distant from:a village off the main road. So here it means "in the sea/ocean away from the US Gulf Coast. From the Coast would mean from the land around the coast or the sea very close to it. sagar grammar Senior Member. Sultan puri - new delhi. hindi-india Nov 27, 2017 #3 Franco-filly said: "Off" the See more ...

Using Off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Dear Members I would like to know if the sentencses below sound natural. First I will mention the context in which I am planning to use them. Context - I was talking with a friend of mine and suddenly he started talking about politics but I don't like politics so A. When my friend switched to See more ...

analysis of or on | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Is there any subtle difference between : Analysis of what went wrong Analysis on what went wrong Thanks a lot See more ...

"stripped him -of-/-off-" | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: "They stripped him -off- his clothes," Please comment. Thanks, Er.S.M.M.Hanifa . M. MonikaUSA Senior Member. California. English - USA Nov 1, 2010 #2 Hello, Er.S.M.M.Hanifa: They stripped him of his clothes is like saying They stripped off his clothes, beat him or His clothes were stripped off of him, he was beaten Good luck! sound shift Senior Member. Derby (central England) English See more ...

"Capable of" vs. "capable to" | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: "The brain is capable of generating visual representations" Or perhaps capable to generate would be better? Or some other phrasing. What is the semantic difference between capable of and capable to? See more ...

Drop someone off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Here, off means not on the surface of a road or a path. It could also be taken to mean off the surface of the seat in a car. No, off does not mean away in this case Nor does it mean away in other cases. The driver dropped them off at the airport. The driver dropped them off the road or path that the driver was on. A road, or a path, is a surface. Or the driver dropped them off the surface that See more ...

go off of | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: As others have said, in "Still, this is a large area to cover with only a physical description to go off of/go on", the "go off of" or "go on" means "to work from" or "to use as our reference". For example, "It will be difficult to locate the car involved in the robbery with only a partial license plate number to go on. There are over a million cars in this city." The partial license plate See more ...

Consist Of? In? On? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: From Kenneth G. Wilson (1923–). The Columbia Guide to Standard American English. 1993. Consist in means “is inherent in or lies within”: His social success consists in being able to persuade everyone of his amiability. It usually occurs in sentences with singular subjects that consist in either singular or plural nominals. Consist of means “is composed or made up of”: His fleet See more ...

Overview of / overview on? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hi all, I would like to know if the name "overview" is followed by the preposition "of" or "on". I would think that the right answer is "of", but I'm waiting for the opinion of native speakers The context where I need to use this word: "I followed a training day and, on this occasion, I had See more ...

Fall over/ off/down? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Tim fell off the tree. (Because he was probably hanging onto it.) Tim fell down the stairs. (Unless this was an outdoor staircase without a strong guard rail, in which case he could have fallen off the side.) Tim fell off the horse. (Because he was sitting on top of it.) See more ...

off he went | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: You cannot say off went the milk except in a fairy story where it goes on a journey with the sugar bowl! sleepymarmot Senior Member. Italy - Italian Nov 17, 2007 #9 Arrius said: A note of caution: off went the milkman, but the milk went off (became bad, undrinkable). You cannot See more ...

I'm going to be off to go home. | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hi I am off at six o'clock in the evening everyday. today, I had to work overtime. At 7 o'clock, my colleague said that he would go out to have a dinner. I said "I am also going to be off to go home". however I felt what I said didn't sound natural. I'd like to use "off" in the sentence. how See more ...

experience, of, in or with | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: I am not sure if the phrase "to have experience of" is commonly used. "In" and "with" are more frequently used with it. I would think that to have experience in something refers to a particular field.For example, "I have a lot of experience in sales and marketing" or "I have experience in teaching." See more ...

leverage off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: I don't think it's really "leverage off" as a term but rather "get leverage from this" (off this = from this). What is meant by leverage depends on the context. B. bh7 Senior Member. Limestone City. Canada; English Jun 25, 2012 #3 Uncle Bob is right, it's not very clear English. The writer imagines the synergies as a springboard that will allow the parties to propel themselves to new heights See more ...

run off of | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: "The rain runs off into a cistern" = "The rain runs [from the roof] (and) into a cistern" The appearance of two prepositions together is rare and therefore "off" can be seen as an adverb. The alternative view is that the two prepositions are not together because there is the implied noun (roof) between them. It is worth noting that "off the roof" is an adverbial phrase. hhtt: there is no See more ...

get off or get off at | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Put me down in the "before the one I usually get off at" camp. If you leave out the "at" it sounds to me like you're "getting the stop off", which sounds a bit kinky. PS: there will surely be grammar police somewhere eager to tell you the correct construction is "before the one at which I usually get off". Just ignore them. We won that battle See more ...

Why one-off, not one-of? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: It comes out of manufacturing, in which off has long been used to mark a number of items to be produced of one kind: 20-off, 500-off. This seems to have begun in foundry work, or a similar trade, in which items were cast off a mould or from a pattern See more ...

Turn off/Switch off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: I think you can say "switch off" when there is a button to press, is that rith? Then, switch on the computer because you press the button turn off the computer because to turn it off you don't press any button? Or isn't it so strict? What a mess Thanks, it's a doubt I have every day! D. difficult cuss Senior Member . English England Dec 8, 2006 #13 I switch which you push, usually has two See more ...

Take part of/in | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: "Take part in" means participar en. "Take part of" isn't really a fixed expression; it means literally to take a portion of something. I'm going to take part in a theatre festival in Lyons. See more ...

Scab off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: "Scab off" is certainly pejorative and a bit vulgar though, while "sponge off" is more neutral. Also, I don't recognise "ponce off" in this context, to me, "ponce off" means, someone walks off in a sulk. For example, she ponced off when he didn't give her any money See more ...

raise awareness (about / that / on ) | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hi, I like this expression but sometimes I don't know how to use it. I think sentences 1 and 2 are correct, whereas 3 is wrong. 1) It's useful to raise awareness about the dangers of eating fast food. 2) It's useful to raise awareness on the dangers of eating fast food. 3) It's useful to raise See more ...

Aware of / aware about ? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hi, you need to say aware of something.We would not say "aware about" in English. Hope that helps. See more ...

optional prepositions: 'off of' vs. 'off' | WordReference

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Offer Details: In English, we can say "Take me off of your mailing list" or "take me off your mailing list". Both constructions are correct and convey the same meaning. The preposition 'of' in this case is optional, whether to include or to omit it. 'Of' can be omitted because it is so obviously implied as to be superfluous. Structurally diagramming the sentence, one would do so with 'of your mailing list See more ...

"Choice of" or "Choice for" | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Which one of the following looks more natural and grammatical correct? 1. Faisal is the man of choice for every company. 2. Faisal is the man of choice of every company. Thanks in advance!!! See more ...

hose off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: "Seal off" is not even mentioned in your post or in your referenced link. How did that get dragged into the discussion? "Hose off" means to rinse with a hose. It doesn't matter whether one is talking about a sidewalk, a driveway or an automobile. We add "off" to many verbs, i.e. Wash off Rinse off Hose off Run off (See yesterday's thread: run off to the Bahamas). not to mention "piss off" L See more ...

Off and on - or on and off? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: "The OED documents off and on from 1535, but on and off only from the nineteenth century [Eighteenth?]. CIC has 4.5 times as many tokens of on and off as of off and on in British texts, and only twice as many in American texts." Were you busy yesterday--how to respond? La Soeur Lumière New Member. East Anglia, UK . English - British Mar 29, 2016 #6 Thanks all, particularly to Velisarius for See more ...

my tooth came out or off? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: And this is how you use "come off" 58. come off, Informal. a. to happen; occur. b. to reach the end; acquit oneself: to come off with honors. c. to be given or completed; occur; result: Her speech came off very well. d. to succeed; be successful: The end of the novel just doesn't come off. 59. come off it, Informal. to stop being wrong, foolish, or pretentious; be truthful or honest: Come off See more ...

To work off a premise | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Working off a premise or working on a premise both require that a theory be put forth and evidence to support that theory is sought. To my mind both mean the identical thing. (The risk of working off/on a premise is that you have decided in advance of the evidence what the conclusion will be and only seek out additional evidence that supports that premise. An efficient, but flawed way to run See more ...

Preposition: Get me; her

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Offer Details: Mick Jagger of the band, the Rolling Stones provides another example of AE support with the use of, "off of" becoming "off-a" to both emulate the American accent and enhance the lyrical melody: "Hey!.. YOU!.. Get off-a (off of) my cloud!" If you try to say, "get off my cloud!" the "-a" sound almost exists anyway. Not surprising then, that off of is recognised. Mr Bones Senior Member. Madrid See more ...

6 off, surplus to manufacturing requirements

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Offer Details: The "off" seems to be a shorthand form of "off the end of the production line/machine." Please do not use it. Andygc Senior Member. Devon. British English Mar 11, 2014 #6 I disagree strongly with PaulQ, the use of "off" as I have described is common in many walks of British life. entangledbank Senior Member. London. English - South-East England Mar 11, 2014 #7 I'm sure we've had a longer See more ...

Off in the pub | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hello forum members, Where were you? Off in the pub with that old fool of a ferryman. (source: Song of the Sea (2014) Movie) My question is all about the preposition "off". I am already familiar with "off to". for example: A. where are you off to? B. I am off to Enschede. As far as I See more ...

think of-off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: “Off” funciona como un adverbio, adjetivo, preposición, sustantivo y en unos casos, un verbo. The light is off. -Adjectivo This button is about to come off. -Adverbio Take your feet off the table. -Preposición “Of” es semejante a “de” en español. Sólo es un preposición. To die of hunger. One of us. Off versus Of es muy difícil aprender. Te recomiendo que leas artículos See more ...

Off or off of? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: My understanding is that, in general, most educated BE speakers consider off of to be wrong. However, in everyday spoken BE it is common. I believe that many AE speakers consider it to be normal, grammatically-correct English. With a bit of luck an AE speaker will come along soon to confirm the AE bit of that, and the thread will be available for whoever next asks the same question. Andygc See more ...

drive off / drive away | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: I find drive off neutral generally and also in your sentence. However, I have a feeling that when impatience or a furious speed is mentioned in a sentence, you are more likely to write drive off than drive away. B. Biffo Senior Member. England. English - England Aug 5, 2013 #5 e2efour said: However, I have a feeling that when impatience or a furious speed is mentioned in a sentence, you are See more ...

10 off (British English) | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: He said, "The 10 off would be the (model number)." What does he mean exactly by 10 off? Thanks in advance. E. Egmont Senior Member. Massachusetts, U.S. English - U.S. Nov 23, 2012 #2 It might mean that the customer wants a discount of 10 percent off the usual price. It might also mean that the customer wants 10 of those systems. However, I'd ask him to clarify: "I'm afraid I don't understand See more ...

Friday(s) is/are my day(s) off. | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hi all, if I don't work on Fridays, and I want to express that using "day off", should I say: 1. Friday is my day off. or 2. Fridays are my days off. My guess is that 2 is correct because every Friday, I don't work. Many thanks! See more ...

"Jumped from/off a cliff" | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Note also that a "jumping-off place" is a place from which one departs and has nothing to do with plunging off of something. cycloneviv Senior Member. Perth, Western Australia. English - Australia Aug 22, 2007 #10 You can also jump "from" something if you are inside of it: "He jumped from the speeding car as it roared around the bend." "She leapt/jumped from the burning building, into the arms See more ...

Better off - Worst off | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: No, it should be 'worse off' here, with the usual comparative pair 'better' and 'worse'. I suppose as 'worse' and 'worst' sound so much alike, they're easy to confuse. If you're talking about the maximal and minimal values among three or more groups, one group can be the best off and one the worst off: the usual superlative pair. F. Franco-filly Senior Member. Southern England. English See more ...

To Go Off a Book(??) | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: To "go off book" is a theater term that means having the script memorized (i.e., you no longer get to carry the script -- or "book" -- during rehearsals). I think it's used more generally to mean improvising, or getting away from expected language. Can you provide some context as to how it was used in the movie? See more ...

lie off = lay off ??? | WordReference Forums

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Offer Details: Hi, Does lie off mean the same as lay off please? Here’s an example: 3000 employees were laid off. 3000 employees were lain off. [The sentences come from a test and both are correct] I must admit I knew only lay off (in the meaning to fire someone) and never saw lie off used in this meaning. I did a quick research and Google doesn’t give many hits of lie off. See more ...

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